The small town of Silvan is 40km east of Melbourne, in the Yarra Ranges. Every year, in September and October, it is the home of the Tesselaar Tulip Festival.

(Sony A200, ISO 100, f/5.6, 40mm [60mm equiv.], 1/250s)

I visited the festival in October of 2009, on a cloudy and drizzly day that made the colours of the tulips stand out even more.


In Sneffels Jokulis craterem, quem delibat umbra Scartaris, Julii intra kalendas descende, audax viator, et terrestre centrum attinges; quod feci. Arne Saknussemm

Descend, bold traveller, into the crater of the jökull of Snæfell, which the shadow of Scartaris touches before the Kalends of July, and you will attain the centre of the earth. I did it. Arne Saknussemm

The Snæfellsjökull mountain, on the western tip of the Snæfellsness peninsula in Iceland, is the start of the journey to the centre of the Earth in Jules Verne’s book. It is, as many mountains in Iceland, a volcano; it is believed to have last erupted around 1,800 years ago.

(Sony A65, ISO 100, f/9, 30mm [45mm equiv.], 1/80s)

This photo, taken in October of 2013, shows the mountain as seen from the village of Hellnar, looking more or less northwest – that is Hellnar Church in the foreground.

Cat Café, Melbourne

I spent a long weekend in Melbourne a while back, and one of the things I had to do there was to visit the Cat Café that had recently opened.

(Sony A65, ISO 1600, f/22, 35mm [52mm equiv.], 1/25s)

This is Jasper, one of the several cats living at the Café. I had a great time there; they had many cats with very different personalities, and many environments where they can play or relax. This photo was taken in June of 2015, but the Cat Café Melbourne is still open, at a different location now but still in the centre of Melbourne. Worth a visit.

Sunset at the Washington Monument

I was lucky to get this very interesting cloud formation at sunset when I was at the National Mall during my only visit to Washington DC.

(Sony A65, ISO 100, f/8, 17mm [25mm equiv.], 1/400s)

This photo was taken in October of 2015. I was in DC for just a weekend, and I spent most of the time at the Mall, going from museum to museum. I really need to go back some time.


Kolgrafarfjörður is a fjord on the northern coast of the Snæfellsnes peninsula, on Iceland’s west coast. The whole peninsula is an amazingly beautiful place, with landscapes that change dramatically on every turn of the road.

(Sony A65, ISO 100, f/13, 18mm [27mm equiv.], 1/125s)

This photo was taken from the side of the road, from the aptly named Kolgrafarfjörður Viewpoint, looking south towards the centre of the peninsula. It was late autumn (October of 2013) and the weather was cold but snow wasn’t yet quite reaching the lower levels, and all roads were open.

Lone tree

Flinders Island is the largest of a set of islands that sit between mainland Australia and Tasmania, in the Bass Strait. As one might expect, not many people live there – the island has a small airport, two towns and many, many sheep. Also native fauna: kangaroos, wallabies, wombats are very easy to find, to the point that driving at night is a bit of a risk.

(Sony A65, ISO 100, f/8.0, 26mm [39mm equiv.], 1/320s)

This lone tree is on the west coast of the island, overlooking Fotheringate Bay with the Strzelecki mountains in the background. It’s a very windy location most of the year, and in the particular day I was there (in May of 2016) it was dangerously so.

Water lily

The Adelaide Botanic Gardens are right by the city centre – in fact, the city centre is completely enclosed by parks.

(ISO 400, f/9.0, 60mm, 1/200 sec) (click for full-size view)

I took this photo in May of 2014, the only time I visited Adelaide (and then only for a weekend). I thought it was a lovely city, and the Botanic Gardens are a great place to spend an autumn afternoon.

Red Rock Canyon

Red Rock Canyon is just outside Las Vegas, in the Nevada desert. As you can see in the photo, the origin of the name is very clear: the rocks are red.

(ISO 100, f/10.0, 18mm, 1/250 sec) (click for full-size view)

There is a visitors centre nearby, and a scenic loop road you can drive on – which is good, because the Nevada desert can be a very hot place and this is a very large area. There are multiple walking trails, too, but this photo was taken in July of 2009, in the middle of summer, so I didn’t really walk around all that much.


Over the last few years – since the last time I wrote here – I’ve been dedicating more time to photography. It’s been a hobby of mine for quite a while, and I’ve been putting a bit more effort into improving at it recently, including both thinking more about the photos I take and spending time to post-process them.

Then, in the last few months I started going over my collection of photos from the last ten years or so and picking up “the good ones” to work on. I ended up with a small selection of photos that I really like; some of them are particularly beautiful, some are technically good or difficult, some simply have emotional value.

I wanted to share these photos – make them visible to more people – but I don’t really want to simply put them into Instagram or Facebook. So, I’ll put them here, maybe one every week or so, in a random order (thanks to random.org) and let’s see if anyone sees them.

This is the first one. Click on it for a full size view.

(ISO 100, f/5.0, 50mm, 1/125 sec)

I took this one at the Floriade, in Canberra, in September of 2015. It was a cloudy day, so not the best light to photograph flowers, but this one came out pretty good. I just wish the bee were looking towards the camera.